Finance Major Course Descriptions

The Accounting Major is designed to prepare a student for a career in accounting, either in the corporate arena or in public accounting. Students will study all of the main areas of financial and managerial accounting in order to have a broad overview of the field.

The following courses: (12 units)

FIN 321 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT I I

Prerequisite: FIN 320
A continuation of the study of quantitative and qualitative techniques applicable to financial management, this course is case-based, using current events as its subject. Topics include the following: financial decision making for start-ups, due diligence, financial and operating leverage, optimum capital structure, risk analysis, forecasting, public versus private funding, regression analysis, dividend policy, currency fluctuation, and hedging. Research sources include annual reports, 10Ks, 10Qs, proxies and prospectuses, Internet and subscription references.  The goal of the course is to prepare students for decision-making as business owners, managers, and as financial analysts.

FIN 335 FINANCIAL MODELING

Prerequisite: FIN 320
This course surveys Excel-based programs to obtain and analyze capital budgets, cash flow statements, and to calculate the present values of financial securities. Students analyze investment alternatives and learn the formulas used to determine rates of return and risks of portfolios. The course also describes stock market transaction systems.

FIN 499 FINANCE INTERNSHIP (3 or 6 UNITS)

Prerequisites: FIN 320, FIN 321 or FIN 335 or FIN 430 or FIN 433 as appropriate
Internships provide an opportunity for hands-on experience in an area in the field of finance which the student may want to pursue. Also see “Internships” for general information and policies.

Four courses selected from the following courses: (12 units)

FIN 430 INVESTMENTS

Prerequisite: FIN 320
In this course students examine the development of individual financial planning tools for the orderly accumulation, conservation, and use (as well as eventual transfer) of an estate. They also analyze the investment characteristics of securities, sources of investment information, the New York Stock Exchange, income, and how to deal with changing economic conditions.

FIN 431 STUDENT INVESTMENT FUND

Prerequisites: Fin 321, FIN 335, FIN 430
The primary objective of the class is to provide a select group of students the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in security research and analysis, asset valuation, asset allocation, and portfolio management as fiduciary fund managers of an actual investment portfolio.

FIN 433 INTERMEDIATE REAL ESTATE FINANCE

Prerequisite: FIN 320
This course studies the financial decisions that must be made in the business of real estate: Students will learn how to evaluate different properties, how to make investment decisions, and how to finance these investments. Students are also introduced to recent financial innovations in real estate like mortgage-backed securities and markets for them. Students learn how to analyze financial decisions in real estate development and investment using time-tested techniques. The course begins with an overview of the fundamentals of income-producing real estate and builds on these concepts studying real estate investment analysis, financial leverage, fixed-rate mortgage loans and more flexible mortgage arrangements, mortgage payment issues, debt securitization, real options, and REITs.

FIN 438 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

Prerequisite: FIN 320
What are the typical goals and concerns of a financial manager in a large corporation? What must be taken into consideration when doing business overseas or owning assets in a foreign country? The scope of this course includes answers to these questions in terms of economic determinants of prices and policy issues that result for private enterprises and public policy makers in the realm of international financial transactions.

FIN 439 FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Prerequisite: FIN 320
For students who want a detailed overview of the entire financial system of the United States and its component parts (excluding banks), this course is the answer. Keeping in mind the ever-increasing importance of globalization for our markets and institutions, the objective of this course is to present a thorough, detailed overview of financial institutions. Wherever necessary and/or appropriate, this course investigates in depth the evolution of these financial institutions. Banks, however, are excluded because they are studied in a separate course, Money and Banking, which looks into the operations of banks in detail.

FIN 442 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE

Prerequisite: FIN 320
For students excited to learn how start ups get started, how they grow, and finally “go public”  in an IPO (Initial Public Offering) this course is a must. Topics include how much money to raise, when it should be raised, how it might be provided, who might provide it, how the company gets valued, and finally how funding can be structured.  Students consider entrepreneurship from the perspective of both the entrepreneur and the venture capitalist.

FIN 462 MONEY AND BANKING

Prerequisite: FIN 320
Developed in the early 19th century, the U.S. banking system has a fascinating and instructive history. This course analyzes the structure and function of commercial and savings banks in the United States, reviews the workings of the Federal Reserve system and its primary instruments of monetary control, and explores in detail the regulatory issues confronting the banking sector today.

FIN 465 DERIVATIVES

Prerequisite: FIN 320
Want to manage financial risk? Care to deal in futures, swaps, and options? If so, students will want to take this course in which they will learn how to value securities and how to use them for risk management purposes. A central theme of class discussions will be valuation and how there should be no opportunities for riskless arbitrage in an efficient market. Students will also learn the mechanics of futures and option trading and implement trading strategies to mitigate various types of price exposures. This course also studies the process of securitization.

FIN 482 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE

Prerequisite: Varies by subject
Content varies depending on the interest of both the professor and the students.

Optional:

FIN 498 INDIVIDUAL DIRECTED RESEARCH IN FINANCE (1-3 UNITS)

For the course description, see “Individual Directed Research” in the Catalog.